The possibility of impact from multiple tropical storms or hurricanes spanning the shores of the Caribbean to the southeastern U.S. could set the stage for a very tropical October (“Troptober”).

The 14-day period beginning in late September into mid-October could yield three to five named systems in these waters.

The amount of disruptions to travel and oil/gas production, as well as flooding, damage and risk to human lives caused by these storms would depend on their strength and exact location.

The tropics may make up for lost time in terms of direct impacts from tropical storms and/or hurricanes on the U.S., as the nearby waters of the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean and the southwestern Atlantic are primed to explode during October.

October may be the month the southeastern U.S. is battered by multiple tropical storms or hurricanes.

AccuWeather.com Hurricane Expert Joe Bastardi remains very concerned that the raging La Niña and its associated cool waters in the tropical Pacific have created a tremendous imbalance.

That imbalance must be dealt with via tropical cyclones in the southwest part of the Atlantic Basin where warm waters have led to a buildup of heat.

Factoring in climatology, tropical activity shifts to the far western Atlantic during October with the decline of the Cape Verde season.

Now computer models seem to be rallying to support Joe’s concern with a barrage of tropical cyclones appearing to form in succession over the Caribbean and the southwestern Atlantic during the last few days of September through the first part in October.

The GFS and other models are suggesting multiple tropical cyclones will fire in the Caribbean and southwest Atlantic waters over then next few weeks. This image is the GFS forecast for Oct. 5, 2010.

If these models are right, Florida, part of the Gulf Coast, the southern Atlantic Seaboard, Cuba, Hispaniola, Puerto Rico and the Bahamas could be in for multiple rounds of heavy rains, gusty winds, rough seas and battering surf.

The combination of La Nina, climatology and the computer models should have interests keeping a very close eye on the situation in the Southwest Atlantic Basin.

Our first tropical system in this series is likely to take shape by early next week in the Caribbean.

The possibility of impact from multiple tropical storms or hurricanes spanning the shores of the Caribbean to the southeastern U.S. could set the stage for a very tropical October (“Troptober”).

The 14-day period beginning in late September into mid-October could yield three to five named systems in these waters.

The amount of disruptions to travel and oil/gas production, as well as flooding, damage and risk to human lives caused by these storms would depend on their strength and exact location.

The tropics may make up for lost time in terms of direct impacts from tropical storms and/or hurricanes on the U.S., as the nearby waters of the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean and the southwestern Atlantic are primed to explode during October.

October may be the month the southeastern U.S. is battered by multiple tropical storms or hurricanes.

AccuWeather.com Hurricane Expert Joe Bastardi remains very concerned that the raging La Niña and its associated cool waters in the tropical Pacific have created a tremendous imbalance.

That imbalance must be dealt with via tropical cyclones in the southwest part of the Atlantic Basin where warm waters have led to a buildup of heat.

Factoring in climatology, tropical activity shifts to the far western Atlantic during October with the decline of the Cape Verde season.

Now computer models seem to be rallying to support Joe’s concern with a barrage of tropical cyclones appearing to form in succession over the Caribbean and the southwestern Atlantic during the last few days of September through the first part in October.

The GFS and other models are suggesting multiple tropical cyclones will fire in the Caribbean and southwest Atlantic waters over then next few weeks. This image is the GFS forecast for Oct. 5, 2010.

If these models are right, Florida, part of the Gulf Coast, the southern Atlantic Seaboard, Cuba, Hispaniola, Puerto Rico and the Bahamas could be in for multiple rounds of heavy rains, gusty winds, rough seas and battering surf.

The combination of La Nina, climatology and the computer models should have interests keeping a very close eye on the situation in the Southwest Atlantic Basin.

Our first tropical system in this series is likely to take shape by early next week in the Caribbean.

Courtesy of Accuweather.com

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