This article below should infuriate TV meteorologists.

Global Warming supporters are not only pushing their rhetoric harder, but they are now trying to push “Re-Education” for TV meteorologists… The “re-educators” believe that they have enough “proof” and “historical data” on their side (Not!)… And that we are ignorant for not buying into their garble… Which is largely a political and money-driven argument…

This is really something.

The job opening listed below advertises for an NSF-funded  program at George Mason University, for the “education” of TV weathercasters, on how “unusual weather events” ARE connected to “climate change”. Apparently, their “weather is not climate” maxim has been thrown out the window in a desperate attempt to salvage sinking public opinion on the issue.

Read the article below and form your OWN opinion…

TV Weathercaster Re-Education Proposed by NSF and GMU

“This project will focus on establishing a national network of on-air broadcast meteorologists, climate scientists, university research programs, and key climate and weather science organizations, to engage, train, and empower local broadcast meteorologists to educate and inform the American public about climate.”

I suppose this relates to Dr. Kevin Trenberth’s statement about TV weathercasters in his recent speech preprint to be delivered at the upcoming AMS convention in Seattle.

 

Nevertheless, the natural variability provides valuable opportunities for ongoing “news” and education, as teachable moments, but many scientists have not been helpful, and many TV weathercasters are poorly informed and sometimes downright hostile (Wilson 2009).

From personal experience, I imagine lots of TV meteorologists will be even more hostile when their News Director gets a call from the “climate re-educators” asking why their on-air person didn’t “link the hailstorm yesterday to global warming”.

Get a load of this statement:

It will also adapt and test conflict resolution theory and practice to engage meteorologists who reject the scientific consensus and climate scientists in constructive dialogue.

The George Mason University Center for Climate Change Communication invites applications for a full-time Postdoctoral Research Fellow to support an NSF-funded planning grant titled Making the Global Local: Unusual Weather Events as Climate Change Education Opportunities. The goal of this project is to establish a national network of climate and weather science organizations, and university research and teaching programs, to engage, train, and empower local broadcast meteorologists to educate and inform the American public about climate change. The project will integrate informal learning, mass communication, and experiential learning theories to develop and test new pedagogical approaches to informal science education through frequent mass media exposure, linked to realworld experience (i.e., the local weather). It will also adapt and test conflict resolution theory and practice to engage meteorologists who reject the scientific consensus and climate scientists in constructive dialogue. Collaborating institutions include National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration, American Meteorological Society, National Weather Association, American Association of State Climatologists, American Geophysical Union, Climate Central, National Environmental Education Foundation, and Yale and Cornell universities.

Candidates must have a PhD in a relevant social or learning science discipline, and a track record of published journal articles and/or conference papers on relevant topics of inquiry including climate change communication, science communication and/or formal or informal science education. Experience in survey research, qualitative data collection, strategic (program) planning, professional development, and climate science is preferred. Additional skills required include competence in planning and multitasking, attention to detail, excellent organizational skills, ability to communicate verbally and in writing, and the ability to adapt to the changing demands of a dynamic research environment.

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