You are currently browsing the monthly archive for May 2011.

MAX/MIN TEMPERATURE AND PRECIPITATION TABLE FOR
SOUTHEAST AL...EASTERN FL PANHANDLE ...
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE TALLAHASSEE FL
834 PM EDT TUE MAY 31 2011

HIGH TEMPERATURE TODAY
LOW TEMPERATURE PAST 18 HOURS
24 HOUR PRECIPITATION ENDING AT 8PM EDT / 7PM CDT


.BR TAE 0531 E DH20/TAIRZX/DH20/TAIRZP/PPDRZZ
:AIRPORT OBSERVATIONS - EASTERN TIME ZONE
:AS OF 8PM EDT
:
:                                 MAX   MIN
:                                 TEMP  TEMP   PCPN
:
TLH  : TALLAHASSEE              :  98 /  67 /  0.00
AAF  : APALACHICOLA             :  87 /  72 /  0.00
40J  : PERRY                    :  96 /  66 /  0.00
CTY  : CROSS CITY               :  95 /  63 /  0.00
JAX  : JACKSONVILLE INTL        :  88 /  65 /  0.00
ABY  : ALBANY                   :  97 /  69 /  0.00
VAD  : MOODY AFB                :  95 /  65 /  0.00
VLD  : VALDOSTA                 :  98 /  65 /  0.00
BGE  : BAINBRIDGE               :  95 /  70 /
BIJ  : BLAKELY                  :  97 /  66 /
MGR  : MOULTRIE                 :  97 /  70 /
TMA  : TIFTON                   :  91 /  64 /
TVI  : THOMASVILLE              :  96 /  68 /
:
.END


.BR TAE 0531 C DH19/TAIRZX/DH19/TAIRZP/PPDRZZ
:
:AIRPORT OBSERVATIONS - CENTRAL TIME ZONE
:AS OF 7PM CDT
:
:                                 MAX   MIN
:                                 TEMP  TEMP   PCPN
:
ECP  : PANAMA CITY NW INTL ARPT :  96 /  69 /  0.00
PAM  : TYNDALL AFB              :  87 /  69 /  0.00
VPS  : EGLIN AFB                :  87 /  70 /  0.00
CEW  : CRESTVIEW                :  98 /  66 /  0.00
PNS  : PENSACOLA                :  91 /  73 /  0.00
MAI  : MARIANNA                 : 100 /  72 /  0.00
MOB  : MOBILE                   :  97 /  70 /  0.00
DHN  : DOTHAN                   :  99 /  70 /  0.00
OZR  : OZARK - CAIRNS AIR FIELD :  97 /  69 /  0.00
LOR  : FT RUCKER HELIPORT       :  98 /  67 /  0.00

Dothan reached 99 degrees this afternoon, breaking the old record of 95 set in 2005.

We’ll be pushing 100 again tomorrow! (Record is 102).

Sent to me by a viewer named Tony. Thanks for making me smile!



MAX/MIN TEMPERATURE AND PRECIPITATION TABLE FOR
SOUTHEAST AL...EASTERN FL PANHANDLE ...
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE TALLAHASSEE FL
832 PM EDT MON MAY 30 2011

HIGH TEMPERATURE TODAY
LOW TEMPERATURE PAST 18 HOURS
24 HOUR PRECIPITATION ENDING AT 8PM EDT / 7PM CDT


.BR TAE 0530 E DH20/TAIRZX/DH20/TAIRZP/PPDRZZ
:AIRPORT OBSERVATIONS - EASTERN TIME ZONE
:AS OF 8PM EDT
:
:                                 MAX   MIN
:                                 TEMP  TEMP   PCPN
:
TLH  : TALLAHASSEE              :  96 /  71 /  0.00
AAF  : APALACHICOLA             :  88 /  75 /  0.00
40J  : PERRY                    :  96 /  68 /  0.00
CTY  : CROSS CITY               :  94 /  65 /  0.00
JAX  : JACKSONVILLE INTL        :  86 /  66 /  0.00
ABY  : ALBANY                   :  95 /  70 /  0.00
VAD  : MOODY AFB                :  94 /  66 /  0.00
VLD  : VALDOSTA                 :  96 /  67 /  0.00
BGE  : BAINBRIDGE               :  93 /  70 /
BIJ  : BLAKELY                  :  97 /  70 /
MGR  : MOULTRIE                 :  95 /  72 /
TMA  : TIFTON                   :  91 /  66 /
TVI  : THOMASVILLE              :  95 /  70 /
:
.END


.BR TAE 0530 C DH19/TAIRZX/DH19/TAIRZP/PPDRZZ
:
:AIRPORT OBSERVATIONS - CENTRAL TIME ZONE
:AS OF 7PM CDT
:
:                                 MAX   MIN
:                                 TEMP  TEMP   PCPN
:
ECP  : PANAMA CITY NW INTL ARPT :  93 /  71 /  0.00
PAM  : TYNDALL AFB              :  88 /  73 /  0.00
VPS  : EGLIN AFB                :  87 /  72 /  0.00
CEW  : CRESTVIEW                :  97 /  66 /  0.70
PNS  : PENSACOLA                :  88 /  74 /  0.00
MAI  : MARIANNA                 :  98 /  76 /  0.00
MOB  : MOBILE                   :  94 /  69 /  0.00
DHN  : DOTHAN                   :  97 /  74 /  0.00
OZR  : OZARK - CAIRNS AIR FIELD :  97 /  72 /  0.00
LOR  : FT RUCKER HELIPORT       :  97 /  70 /  0.00
:


95 Degrees on Memorial Day., originally uploaded by wtvywxteam.

Sent from my Droid.

NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center today announced that climate conditions point to a below normal hurricane season in the Eastern Pacific this year. The outlook calls for a 5 percent probability of an above normal season, a 25 percent probability of a near normal season and a 70 percent probability of a below normal season.

Allowing for forecast uncertainties, seasonal hurricane forecasters estimate a 70 percent chance of 9 to 15 named storms, which includes 5 to 8 hurricanes, of which 1 to 3 are expected to become major hurricanes (Category 3, 4 or 5 on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale).

An average Eastern Pacific hurricane season produces 15 to 16 named storms, with eight to nine becoming hurricanes and four becoming major hurricanes. The Eastern Pacific hurricane season runs from May 15 through Nov. 30, with peak activity from July through September.

The main climate factors influencing this year’s Eastern Pacific outlook are:

  • Ongoing conditions, such as increased wind shear, that have been suppressing eastern Pacific hurricane seasons since 1995, and
  • A high likelihood of ENSO-neutral conditions (no El Niño or La Niña) during the peak months (July-September) of the season, but with lingering La Niña impacts into the summer.

 “Regardless of this outlook, NOAA urges people in the Eastern Pacific to prepare for the 2011 hurricane season and remain vigilant throughout the season – it only takes one hurricane to cause a lot of damage and loss of life,” said Gerry Bell, Ph.D., lead seasonal hurricane forecaster at NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center, part of the U.S. National Weather Service.

The outlook is a general guide to the overall seasonal hurricane activity. It does not predict whether, where, or when any of these storms may hit land.

Eastern Pacific tropical storms most often track westward over open waters, sometimes reaching Hawaii and beyond. However, some occasionally head toward the northeast and may bring rainfall to the arid southwestern United States during the summer months. Also, during any given season, two to three tropical storms can affect western Mexico or Central America. Residents, businesses and government agencies of coastal and near-coastal regions should always prepare prior to each and every hurricane season regardless of the seasonal hurricane outlook.

NOAA’s National Weather Service is the primary source of weather data, forecasts and warnings for the United States and its territories. The agency operates the most advanced weather and flood warning and forecast system in the world, helping to protect lives and property and enhance the national economy. Visit us online at weather.gov and on Facebook

NOAA’s mission is to understand and predict changes in the Earth’s environment, from the depths of the ocean to the surface of the sun, and to conserve and manage our coastal and marine resources. Visit us on Facebook.

 

MAX/MIN TEMPERATURE AND PRECIPITATION TABLE FOR
SOUTHEAST AL...EASTERN FL PANHANDLE ...
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE TALLAHASSEE FL
810 PM EDT THU MAY 26 2011

HIGH TEMPERATURE TODAY
LOW TEMPERATURE PAST 18 HOURS
24 HOUR PRECIPITATION ENDING AT 8PM EDT / 7PM CDT


.BR TAE 0526 E DH20/TAIRZX/DH20/TAIRZP/PPDRZZ
:AIRPORT OBSERVATIONS - EASTERN TIME ZONE
:AS OF 8PM EDT
:
:                                 MAX   MIN
:                                 TEMP  TEMP   PCPN
:
TLH  : TALLAHASSEE              :  92 /  67 /  0.00
AAF  : APALACHICOLA             :  86 /  68 /  0.00
40J  : PERRY                    :  91 /  67 /  0.00
CTY  : CROSS CITY               :  92 /  64 /  0.00
JAX  : JACKSONVILLE INTL        :  93 /  66 /  0.00
ABY  : ALBANY                   :  95 /  67 /  0.36
VAD  : MOODY AFB                :  93 /  67 /  0.00
VLD  : VALDOSTA                 :  94 /  67 /  0.00
BGE  : BAINBRIDGE               :  93 /  64 /
BIJ  : BLAKELY                  :  91 /  70 /
MGR  : MOULTRIE                 :  93 /  68 /
TMA  : TIFTON                   :  91 /  66 /
TVI  : THOMASVILLE              :  93 /  67 /
:
.END


.BR TAE 0526 C DH19/TAIRZX/DH19/TAIRZP/PPDRZZ
:
:AIRPORT OBSERVATIONS - CENTRAL TIME ZONE
:AS OF 7PM CDT
:
:                                 MAX   MIN
:                                 TEMP  TEMP   PCPN
:
ECP  : PANAMA CITY NW INTL ARPT :  86 /  65 /  0.00
PAM  : TYNDALL AFB              :  85 /  74 /  0.00
VPS  : EGLIN AFB                :  86 /  76 /    T
CEW  : CRESTVIEW                :  89 /  63 /    T
PNS  : PENSACOLA                :  85 /  75 /  0.01
MAI  : MARIANNA                 :  95 /  71 /  0.00
MOB  : MOBILE                   :  87 /  67 /  0.25
DHN  : DOTHAN                   :  95 /  72 /  0.02
OZR  : OZARK - CAIRNS AIR FIELD :  93 /  71 /    T
LOR  : FT RUCKER HELIPORT       :  93 /  71 /    T


88 Degrees and Clouds at Noon, originally uploaded by wtvywxteam.

Sent from my Droid.

The picture above is a ground-level view of the damage from Tuesday’s EF5 tornado in Joplin, Mo.

Below is a NOAA aerial survey of the damage.

The 1st picture is the Joplin hospital before the tornado struck:

And here’s the “after” picture, with the top 2 floors blown completely off:

More severe weather expected as this powerful storm rips across our nation.

Another wild weather day!!!

75 tornado reports and more rain for an already flooded Mississippi River.

Wednesday’s High Risk Outlook Area…

Just a couple words on this severe weather outbreak…

Several EF 3 & EF 4 tornadoes have been reported across Oklahoma (Tulsa, Piedmont, El Reno, Okahoma City etc.) Texas (Dallas, Ft. Worth) Arkansas (Ozark, Denning), Kansas (Seward, Great Bend etc.)  left paths several miles long up to a mile wide.

Death tolls in the teens from Tuesday, and likely to rise as hundreds are still unaccounted for and many storms moved through the overnight.

The death toll from the single, EF 5 Tornado in Joplin, MO is now at least 123.

Softball and tennis ball sized hail reports coming from Kansas.

Another, rare (usually happens only once a year, this is the fifth time this has happened this year) High Risk area is expected to be outlined across eastern Missouri, Southern Illinois, eastern Arkansass and Western Kentucky later today.

On average, tornadoes kill 56 people per year, in 2011, the count is nearing 500.

The Joplin tornado is the 4th recorded EF 5 tornado of 2011. Previously there have only been 4 EF 5 tornadoes in the past 13 years.

These facts are staggering…..what I hope they emphasize is the importance of awareness, realizing that the “it won’t happen to me” mentality will get you killed, and that being prepared and staying informed will save your life.

WWUS72 KTAE 250750
NPWTAE

URGENT – WEATHER MESSAGE
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE TALLAHASSEE FL
350 AM EDT WED MAY 25 2011

ALZ065>069-FLZ007>014-108-112-114-251400-
/O.NEW.KTAE.FG.Y.0026.110525T0900Z-110525T1400Z/
COFFEE-DALE-HENRY-GENEVA-HOUSTON-INLAND WALTON-CENTRAL WALTON- HOLMES-WASHINGTON-JACKSON-INLAND BAY-CALHOUN-INLAND GULF-
SOUTH WALTON-COASTAL BAY-COASTAL GULF-
INCLUDING THE CITIES OF…ENTERPRISE…OZARK…FORT RUCKER… DALEVILLE…HEADLAND…ABBEVILLE…GENEVA…HARTFORD…SAMSON… SLOCOMB…MALVERN…TAYLOR…ASHFORD…DOTHAN…KINSEY…
COWARTS…WEBB…COTTONWOOD…REHOBETH…DE FUNIAK SPRINGS… HUDSON…BONIFAY…CRYSTAL LAKE…CHIPLEY…FIVE POINTS…
MARIANNA…GRACEVILLE…MALONE…SNEADS…YOUNGSTOWN…
BLOUNTSTOWN…WHITE CITY…WEWAHITCHKA…FREEPORT…
SANTA ROSA BEACH…PANAMA CITY…PARKER…PORT SAINT JOE
350 AM EDT WED MAY 25 2011 /250 AM CDT WED MAY 25 2011/

A Dense Fog Advisory is Now in Effect Until 10 AM EDT /9 Am
Cdt/ This Morning…

the National Weather Service in tallahassee has issued a dense fog advisory, which is in effect until 10 AM EDT /9 AM cdt/ this morning.

* visibility, 1/4 mile or less in many locations.

* impacts, rapidly changing visibilities could make for hazardous driving conditions.

precautionary/preparedness actions…

a dense fog advisory means visibilities will frequently be
reduced to less than one quarter mile. if driving, slow down, use your low beam headlights, and leave plenty of distance ahead of you.

&&

Thanks to our good friend and weather-watcher, Cat,  in Wicksburg, for this picture of Tuesday’s sunset.

The Storm Prediction Center has issued yet another high risk area for severe weather, meaning a 30% chance for a  tornado within a the area highlighted area. Joplin, the Missouri city hit by nealy 200 mph winds in the southwestern part of the state, received an F4 tornado approximately 1/2 mile wide that took a direct hit, tracking more than 6 miles through Joplin. This one tornado killed over 100 people, making it the deadliest single tornado since the 1940’s.

A large negatively tilted upper level low will develop west of the highlighted area and move across Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri and Arkansas with the likelyhood of more damaging tornadoes and high winds.

Closer to home, we will finally see our ridge of high pressure that has been keeping us unseasonably hot and dry, break down beginning Thursday. This will increase our humidity levels and cloud cover, but we will see slightly cooler temperatures and afternoon rainshowers returning.

Afternoon highs will scale back to the upper 80’s by Friday, and we will have cooler afternoons and evenings.

WWUS72 KTAE 241028
NPWTAE

URGENT – WEATHER MESSAGE
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE TALLAHASSEE FL
628 AM EDT TUE MAY 24 2011

ALZ065>069-FLZ007>017-026-027-108-112-114-115-127-GAZ120-121-142- 143-155-156-241400-
/O.NEW.KTAE.FG.Y.0025.110524T1028Z-110524T1400Z/
COFFEE-DALE-HENRY-GENEVA-HOUSTON-INLAND WALTON-CENTRAL WALTON- HOLMES-WASHINGTON-JACKSON-INLAND BAY-CALHOUN-INLAND GULF-
INLAND FRANKLIN-GADSDEN-LEON-LIBERTY-INLAND WAKULLA-SOUTH WALTON- COASTAL BAY-COASTAL GULF-COASTAL FRANKLIN-COASTAL WAKULLA-QUITMAN- CLAY-EARLY-MILLER-SEMINOLE-DECATUR-
INCLUDING THE CITIES OF…ENTERPRISE…OZARK…FORT RUCKER… DALEVILLE…HEADLAND…ABBEVILLE…GENEVA…HARTFORD…SAMSON… SLOCOMB…MALVERN…TAYLOR…ASHFORD…DOTHAN…KINSEY…
COWARTS…WEBB…COTTONWOOD…REHOBETH…DE FUNIAK SPRINGS… HUDSON…BONIFAY…CRYSTAL LAKE…CHIPLEY…FIVE POINTS…
MARIANNA…GRACEVILLE…MALONE…SNEADS…YOUNGSTOWN…
BLOUNTSTOWN…WHITE CITY…WEWAHITCHKA…QUINCY…CHATTAHOOCHEE… TALLAHASSEE…SPRING HILL…SWEETWATER…CRAWFORDVILLE…
FREEPORT…SANTA ROSA BEACH…PANAMA CITY…PARKER…
PORT SAINT JOE…APALACHICOLA…CARRABELLE…SOPCHOPPY…
SAINT MARKS…GEORGETOWN…FORT GAINES…DOUGLASVILLE…BLAKELY… COLQUITT…DONALSONVILLE…BAINBRIDGE
628 AM EDT TUE MAY 24 2011 /528 AM CDT TUE MAY 24 2011/

Dense Fog Advisory in Effect Until 10 AM EDT /9 AM Cdt/ This Morning…

the National Weather Service in tallahassee has issued a dense fog advisory, which is in effect until 10 AM EDT /9 AM cdt/ this morning.

* visibility, expected to be a quarter mile or less.

* impacts, drivers are urged to use caution as fog will reduce visibility and make driving difficult through the morning hours.

precautionary/preparedness actions…

a dense fog advisory means visibilities will frequently be
reduced to less than one quarter mile. if driving, slow down, use your low beam headlights, and leave plenty of distance ahead of you.

&&

WWUS72 KTAE 230648
NPWTAE

URGENT – WEATHER MESSAGE
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE TALLAHASSEE FL
248 AM EDT MON MAY 23 2011

ALZ065>069-FLZ007>018-026-027-108-112-114-115-118-127-GAZ120-121- 142-143-155>157-231400-
/O.NEW.KTAE.FG.Y.0024.110523T0648Z-110523T1400Z/
COFFEE-DALE-HENRY-GENEVA-HOUSTON-INLAND WALTON-CENTRAL WALTON- HOLMES-WASHINGTON-JACKSON-INLAND BAY-CALHOUN-INLAND GULF-
INLAND FRANKLIN-GADSDEN-LEON-INLAND JEFFERSON-LIBERTY-
INLAND WAKULLA-SOUTH WALTON-COASTAL BAY-COASTAL GULF-
COASTAL FRANKLIN-COASTAL JEFFERSON-COASTAL WAKULLA-QUITMAN-CLAY- EARLY-MILLER-SEMINOLE-DECATUR-GRADY-
INCLUDING THE CITIES OF…ENTERPRISE…OZARK…FORT RUCKER… DALEVILLE…HEADLAND…ABBEVILLE…GENEVA…HARTFORD…SAMSON… SLOCOMB…MALVERN…TAYLOR…ASHFORD…DOTHAN…KINSEY…
COWARTS…WEBB…COTTONWOOD…REHOBETH…DE FUNIAK SPRINGS… HUDSON…BONIFAY…CRYSTAL LAKE…CHIPLEY…FIVE POINTS…
MARIANNA…GRACEVILLE…MALONE…SNEADS…YOUNGSTOWN…
BLOUNTSTOWN…WHITE CITY…WEWAHITCHKA…QUINCY…CHATTAHOOCHEE… TALLAHASSEE…SPRING HILL…MONTICELLO…SWEETWATER…
CRAWFORDVILLE…FREEPORT…SANTA ROSA BEACH…PANAMA CITY… PARKER…PORT SAINT JOE…APALACHICOLA…CARRABELLE…SOPCHOPPY… SAINT MARKS…GEORGETOWN…FORT GAINES…DOUGLASVILLE…BLAKELY… COLQUITT…DONALSONVILLE…BAINBRIDGE…CAIRO
248 AM EDT MON MAY 23 2011 /148 AM CDT MON MAY 23 2011/

Dense Fog Advisory in Effect Until 10 AM EDT /9 AM Cdt/ This Morning…

the National Weather Service in tallahassee has issued a dense fog advisory, which is in effect until 10 AM EDT /9 AM cdt/ this morning.

* visibility, expected to be a quarter mile or less.

* impacts, drivers are urged to use caution as fog will reduce visibility and make driving difficult through the morning hours.

precautionary/preparedness actions…

a dense fog advisory means visibilities will frequently be
reduced to less than one quarter mile. if driving, slow down, use your low beam headlights, and leave plenty of distance ahead of you.

&&

WWUS72 KTAE 221117
NPWTAE

URGENT – WEATHER MESSAGE
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE TALLAHASSEE FL
717 AM EDT SUN MAY 22 2011

ALZ065>069-FLZ007>019-026>028-108-112-114-115-118-127-128-GAZ142- 143-155>160-221400-
/O.NEW.KTAE.FG.Y.0023.110522T1117Z-110522T1400Z/
COFFEE-DALE-HENRY-GENEVA-HOUSTON-INLAND WALTON-CENTRAL WALTON- HOLMES-WASHINGTON-JACKSON-INLAND BAY-CALHOUN-INLAND GULF-
INLAND FRANKLIN-GADSDEN-LEON-INLAND JEFFERSON-MADISON-LIBERTY- INLAND WAKULLA-INLAND TAYLOR-SOUTH WALTON-COASTAL BAY-
COASTAL GULF-COASTAL FRANKLIN-COASTAL JEFFERSON-COASTAL WAKULLA- COASTAL TAYLOR-EARLY-MILLER-SEMINOLE-DECATUR-GRADY-THOMAS-BROOKS- LOWNDES-
INCLUDING THE CITIES OF…ENTERPRISE…OZARK…FORT RUCKER… DALEVILLE…HEADLAND…ABBEVILLE…GENEVA…HARTFORD…SAMSON… SLOCOMB…MALVERN…TAYLOR…ASHFORD…DOTHAN…KINSEY…
COWARTS…WEBB…COTTONWOOD…REHOBETH…DE FUNIAK SPRINGS… HUDSON…BONIFAY…CRYSTAL LAKE…CHIPLEY…FIVE POINTS…
MARIANNA…GRACEVILLE…MALONE…SNEADS…YOUNGSTOWN…
BLOUNTSTOWN…WHITE CITY…WEWAHITCHKA…QUINCY…CHATTAHOOCHEE… TALLAHASSEE…SPRING HILL…MONTICELLO…MADISON…GREENVILLE… SWEETWATER…CRAWFORDVILLE…PERRY…FREEPORT…
SANTA ROSA BEACH…PANAMA CITY…PARKER…PORT SAINT JOE…
APALACHICOLA…CARRABELLE…SOPCHOPPY…SAINT MARKS…
KEATON BEACH…STEINHATCHEE…DOUGLASVILLE…BLAKELY…COLQUITT… DONALSONVILLE…BAINBRIDGE…CAIRO…THOMASVILLE…QUITMAN… VALDOSTA
717 AM EDT SUN MAY 22 2011 /617 AM CDT SUN MAY 22 2011/

Dense Fog Advisory in Effect Until 10 AM EDT /9 AM Cdt/ This Morning…

the National Weather Service in tallahassee has issued a dense fog advisory.

* visibility, expected to be a quarter mile or less.

precautionary/preparedness actions…

a dense fog advisory means visibilities will frequently be reduced to less than one half mile. if driving, slow down, use your low beam headlights, and leave plenty of distance ahead of you.

&&

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

WWUS72 KTAE 210948
NPWTAE

URGENT – WEATHER MESSAGE
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE TALLAHASSEE FL
548 AM EDT SAT MAY 21 2011

ALZ068-069-FLZ007>018-026-027-108-112-114-115-118-127-211300- /O.NEW.KTAE.FG.Y.0022.110521T0948Z-110521T1300Z/
GENEVA-HOUSTON-INLAND WALTON-CENTRAL WALTON-HOLMES-WASHINGTON- JACKSON-INLAND BAY-CALHOUN-INLAND GULF-INLAND FRANKLIN-GADSDEN- LEON-INLAND JEFFERSON-LIBERTY-INLAND WAKULLA-SOUTH WALTON-
COASTAL BAY-COASTAL GULF-COASTAL FRANKLIN-COASTAL JEFFERSON- COASTAL WAKULLA-
INCLUDING THE CITIES OF…GENEVA…HARTFORD…SAMSON…SLOCOMB… MALVERN…TAYLOR…ASHFORD…DOTHAN…KINSEY…COWARTS…WEBB… COTTONWOOD…REHOBETH…DE FUNIAK SPRINGS…HUDSON…BONIFAY… CRYSTAL LAKE…CHIPLEY…FIVE POINTS…MARIANNA…GRACEVILLE… MALONE…SNEADS…YOUNGSTOWN…BLOUNTSTOWN…WHITE CITY…
WEWAHITCHKA…QUINCY…CHATTAHOOCHEE…TALLAHASSEE…
SPRING HILL…MONTICELLO…SWEETWATER…CRAWFORDVILLE…
FREEPORT…SANTA ROSA BEACH…PANAMA CITY…PARKER…
PORT SAINT JOE…APALACHICOLA…CARRABELLE…SOPCHOPPY…
SAINT MARKS
548 AM EDT SAT MAY 21 2011 /448 AM CDT SAT MAY 21 2011/

Dense Fog Advisory in Effect Until 9 AM EDT /8 AM Cdt/ This
Morning…

the National Weather Service in tallahassee has issued a dense fog advisory, which is in effect until 9 AM EDT /8 AM cdt/ this morning.

* visibility, 1/4 mile or less, but visibility will vary greatly over short distances.

* impacts, drivers are urged to use caution as fog will reduce visibility and make driving difficult through the morning hours.

precautionary/preparedness actions…

a dense fog advisory means visibilities will frequently be
reduced to less than one quarter mile. if driving, slow down, use your low beam headlights, and leave plenty of distance ahead of you.

&&

Now at least some counties in all three of our coverage have been upgraded from Severe to Extreme Drought. The drought monitor takes into account river levels, rainfall, soil moisture, snow melt and other variables.

 Drought is not a universal scale. Based on Climatology, what may be considered a drought for one area could be considered a wet season for another part of the world!

To be in Extreme drought indicates high severity, and likely damage to crops and life (vegitation, animals and crops), but it is a cyclical phenomenon and while can take a long time to fix, does tend to do so. Lake Lanier’s water levels in 2009/2010 Georgia is a perfect example. 

This photo is from UPS driver, Jimmy Jones, who is also in the video below.

He took the picture on April 27, from under the 31st Street Bridge Overpass at I-359.

The damaged vehicle on the other side of the road, to the right of the red SUV, is his UPS truck.  He was headed in the opposite direction before the tornado struck!

Listen to what he says happened…

from www.noaa.gov

The Atlantic basin is expected to see an above-normal hurricane season this year, according to the seasonal outlook issued by NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center – a division of the National Weather Service.

Across the entire Atlantic Basin for the six-month season, which begins June 1, NOAA is predicting the following ranges this year:

  • 12 to 18 named storms (winds of 39 mph or higher), of which:
  • 6 to 10 could become hurricanes (winds of 74 mph or higher), including:
  • 3 to 6 major hurricanes (Category 3, 4 or 5; winds of 111 mph or higher)

Each of these ranges has a 70 percent likelihood, and indicate that activity will exceed the seasonal average of 11 named storms, six hurricanes and two major hurricanes.

“The United States was fortunate last year. Winds steered most of the season’s tropical storms and all hurricanes away from our coastlines,” said Jane Lubchenco, Ph.D., under secretary of commerce for oceans and atmosphere and NOAA administrator. “However we can’t count on luck to get us through this season. We need to be prepared, especially with this above-normal outlook.”

Climate factors considered for this outlook are:

  • The continuing high activity era. Since 1995, the tropical multi-decadal signal has brought ocean and atmospheric conditions conducive for development in sync, leading to more active Atlantic hurricane seasons.
  • Warm Atlantic Ocean water. Sea surface temperatures where storms often develop and move across the Atlantic are up to two degrees Fahrenheit warmer-than-average.
  • La Niña, which continues to weaken in the equatorial Pacific Ocean, is expected to dissipate later this month or in June, but its impacts such as reduced wind shear are expected to continue into the hurricane season.

“In addition to multiple climate factors, seasonal climate models also indicate an above-normal season is likely, and even suggest we could see activity comparable to some of the active seasons since 1995,” said Gerry Bell, Ph.D., lead seasonal hurricane forecaster at NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center.

NOAA’s seasonal hurricane outlook does not predict where and when any of these storms may hit. Landfall is dictated by weather patterns in place at the time the storm approaches. For each storm, NOAA’s National Hurricane Center forecasts how these weather patterns affect the storm track, intensity and landfall potential.

“The tornadoes that devastated the South and the large amount of flooding we’ve seen this spring should serve as a reminder that disasters can happen anytime and anywhere. As we move into this hurricane season it’s important to remember that FEMA is just part of an emergency management team that includes the entire federal family, state, local and tribal governments, the private sector and most importantly the public,” said FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate.

“Now is the time, if you haven’t already, to get your plan together for what you and your family would do if disaster strikes. Visit ready.gov to learn more. And if you’re a small business owner, visit www.ready.gov/business to ensure that your business is prepared for a disaster,” added Fugate.

Hurricane impacts are not limited to the coastline; strong winds and flooding rainfall often pose a threat across inland areas along with the risk for tornadoes.

Next week, May 22-28, is national Hurricane Preparedness Week. To help prepare residents of hurricane-prone areas, NOAA is unveiling a new set of video and audio public service announcements featuring NOAA hurricane experts and the FEMA administrator that are available in both English and Spanish. These are available at http://www.hurricanes.gov/prepare.

What’s more importat than the numbers, is the tracks of the storms. Will they affect the United States? If so, what coast and what states? Gulf of Mexico tropical Storms tend to form early in the season, when the water temperatures are at their peak. Later season storms become more of an Atlantic concern. Remember: these predictions are for  the ammount of storms that Develop, not that make landfall.

When you think of what is between the surface of the earth and outer space, what comes to mind?

Most people think it’s just air…where planes fly and where weather happens.

Well did you know that the area where weather happens is only one of five distinct layers of the atmosphere?

Troposphere: This is where we live. It is also where the weather happens. This layer extends up from the surface around 5-10 miles, depending on where you stand.

Stratosphere: This is where the ozone layer is. The ozone helps block us from some of the harmful UV rays coming from the sun. This is also where airplanes like to fly because there isn’t weather-causing turbulence.

Mesosphere: This layer has thick gasses that help slow down meteors and they often burn up before they make it any closer to earth. They leave streaks behind as they burn, giving us a show with what we call meteor showers or shooting stars.

Thermosphere: This layer has a layer within it called the ionosphere. The ionosphere is a layer of electronically charged particles that reflect back radio signals, allowing you to sing along with the song in your car. The thermosphere is also the layer where the Aurora or “Northern Lights” occur and where the space shuttle orbits.

Exosphere: This is the layer where satellites orbit and molecules can escape into “outer space.”

So next time you look up, remember that there is a lot more going on up there than just weather!

Chilly mornings over the past two days have broken record LOWS (yes, you read correctly) Tuesday and Wednesday mornings. Some include…

Dothan: 48º

Mobile:44º

Montgomery: 42º

Tallahassee: 43º

 Apalachicola: 48º,

Destin: 54º

 Pensacola: 49º

 Crestview: 38º

Abbeville: 39º

 


68 Degrees at 11:30 Tuesday, originally uploaded by wtvywxteam.

Sent from my Droid.

Just Kidding! See sunrise below...

 
 
Dauphin Island May 17

Dothan also broke a record morning low set back in 1967….

5o degrees this AM!!!
 
 


63 Degrees at 11:30, originally uploaded by wtvywxteam.

Sent from my Droid.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Photos taken by Dothan Fire Chief Danny Appling

 

(photo from Limestone county Alabama tornado Apr 27, courtesy of Decatur Daily)

Before I list a few web links to allow you to experience the gut wrenching stories of several survivors, I need to interject a few comments:

Many of the survivors either were unaware or ignored the fact that all there was a tornado warning in effect;

Most only acted when they saw or heard the actual tornado;

As I wrote in a post several weeks ago, if you ignore a tornado warning and act only WHEN you see or hear the tornado bearing down on you – then usually you ONLY HAVE 20 to 45 SECONDS BEFORE THE TORNADO IS GONE and the damage is done.

In fact, when you wait to see or hear the tornado before seeking safety, you may not reach your first choice of a safe shelter.

You are still likely to survive BUT your chances of being INJURED (slightly or severely) increase dramatically.

In fact, take note of the excellent account from the University of Alabama student Randy Robbins. He had SEVERAL personal warnings (phone/text) he disregarded from family and friends and admittedly, almost paid for it with his life.

Here are the survivors’ web links and let their painful experiences guide you.

1) 8-year-old pulled into tornado as his home is shredded -

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2011/05/01/year-old-gets-sucked-200mph-alabama-tornado-survives/

2) University of Alabama student blown out of his apartment and seriously injured -

http://blog.al.com/wire/2011/05/tuscaloosa_tornado_experience.html

(NOAA photo of Tuscaloosa tornado Apr 27 damage path – from lower left to upper right)

3) family in extreme north Alabama suffers fatalities from a series of tornadoes on the same day -

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/42848701

4) high school baseball coach loses house but there’s good news -

http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/print?id=6470969&type=story

Finally, here’s a photo of a tornado shredded neighborhood in Pratt City in Birmingham.

In front is an unscathed monument paying tribute to victims of a 1977 tornado that ripped through the same apartment complex.

Enter your email address
below to follow this
blog and receive email updates.

Smart Phone Weather

SE Drought Monitor

U.S. Weather Hazards

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 350 other followers